Help Me Lead!

Katherine GraysonYou’ve described your ideal education technology conference, and here it is.

Going through the Campus Technology Conference post-event evaluations last year was illuminating; the response to our new panel-presentation/networking format was enthusiastic and attendance was way up, reflecting approval of the changes. Still, a compelling pattern emerged: Attendees expressed a need for stronger IT leadership guidance. Campus IT (and related) administrators told us they would be searching for a “roadmap” to IT leadership in 2007- 2008 and beyond. Accordingly, we have designed Campus Technology 2007 (Washington, DC, July 30-Aug. 2) to meet that urgent need.

First off, all-new session and plenary topics for 2007 are designed to address the most pressing issues facing campus technologists, IT administrators, and their peers today; issues that directly affect the ability to move an institution toward a position of IT leadership. Our panels and presenters will tackle such issues as creating successful webbased virtual collaboration environments; building and furthering open knowledge initiatives and campus/community wireless network collaborations; managing the threat of extreme security breaches; and finessing funding for essential IT projects (even when more “saleable” projects threaten to usurp those funds). They’ll look at the advent of gaming in pedagogy (should you get behind it, or is it a flash in the pan?); open source student information systems; the growing use of business intelligence and data mining for competitive edge; how to take your institution to the next level of distance education; and much more.

But importantly, all of our conference presenters will address these issues in light of your own ability to move your institution forward: the political obstacles you may encounter, the career challenges you may face, and the opportunities you should not neglect to embrace. In addition, special sessions such as “Making the Transition: Diary of a New CIO,” “Leading Change Through Community Partnerships,” “Understanding Your Critical Leadership Stages,” and “Leading Community Source Initiatives” are targeted directly at building your personal career skills and improving your professional insight—there’s even a session dedicated to many of the unique issues faced by women in IT.

To help steer you to the presentations focused on your areas of interest, topic clusters are broken down into the areas of IT Leadership, Academic Technologies, Campuswide Systems, Future Vision for the Campus, and Campus Forums (designed for free and informal information exchange). Sessions are marked with “strategic” or “tactical” icons, to further define focus.

We are especially proud to present our outstanding 2007 keynote, Ken Klingenstein (director, Internet2 Middleware and Security Initiative), who will offer concrete guidance about precisely what changes you will need to make, in order to lead in a new internet world. CT2007 attendees may also opt for leadership-focused pre-conference workshops; tours of the tech hubs at the University of Maryland-College Park; and myriad peer/presenter networking opportunities.

Early bird registration is now open; our full program will be available soon. See you in DC!

Katherine Grayson, Editor-In-Chief

What have you seen and heard? Send to: kgrayson@1105media.com.

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