2007 Salary Survey

Satisfaction

Nearly a third of all respondents are dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with their overall compensation.

Satisfaction With Overall Compensation Satisfaction With Overall Compensation by Gender

Satisfaction With Overall Compensation

Possibly, these results also should have run in our Compensation section: If they did, we may have seen a strange contradiction between some of the figures here and some of the answers regarding our respondents' perceptions about how their compensation compares to campus peers and those outside of the academic environment. Here, though, male and female respondents were remarkably similar in their responses to our question about satisfaction with compensation overall. Their responses were no more than one percentage point apart in any range, and they were exactly the same in each of the "satisfied" and "dissatisfied" ranges. What is probably most notable is their combined response to overall compensation: Sorry to say it, but nearly a third (32 percent) of all respondents are either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with their overall compensation.

Base salaries have exceeded the expectations of only 13 percent of respondents.

Satisfaction With Base Salary

Satisfaction With Base Salary

While a full 50 percent of respondents reported that they are satis- fied with their base salaries, it's notable that most of the remaining half of respondents—37 percent of all respondents—indicated that they are dissatisfied or even very dissatisfied with the salaries they are receiving (this is apart from any annual, spot, or performance bonuses they may be receiving). Base salaries have exceeded the expectations of only 13 percent of respondents.

Only 44 percent of all respondents said they are satisfied with compensation beyond their salary.

Satisfaction With Compensation Beyond Salary

Satisfaction With Compensation Beyond Salary

Respondents' satisfaction with compensation beyond salary is, overall, even lower than reported for base salary. Only 44 percent of all respondents said they are satisfied with compensation beyond salary, such as bonus packages, 401(k) plans, and other forms of financial compensation. Almost as many (41 percent) said they are dissatisfied or very dissatisfied. A mere 15 percent said such compensation exceeds their expectations.

Those from the Mid-Atlantic area are most satisfied with their pay: 74 percent reported in the top satisfaction tiers.

Overall Compensation by Region

Overall Compensation by Region

Results expressed by region return to a more symmetrical graph. Respondents from the South are the most dissatisfied—more than one-third (37 percent) reported dissatisfaction with their overall compensation. Respondents from the Mid-Atlantic region are the most satisfied—nearly three-fourths (74 percent) reported that they are satisfied, more than satisfied, or highly satisfied.

Over 65? You’re happiest with your compensation.

Overall Compensation by Age Group

Overall Compensation by Age Group

Graphing satisfaction with overall compensation by age shows a broad range of responses with no particular bulge pattern. But the most interesting data point probably occurs in the 65 or over age group, where nearly three-fourths (74 percent) reported they are satisfied, more than satisfied, or highly satisfied. The least satisfied age group is 50-54, of which 40 percent reported they are dissatisfied or very dissatisfied. They are closely followed by the very youngest group tracked—those under 29—in which 38 percent said they are dissatisfied or very dissatisfied. Bottom line: If you're retirement age or older, you're happy to be bringing home a paycheck.

Most satisfied with overall compensation: Surprisingly enough, the 'for-profit/other' institutions.

Overall Compensation by Institution Type

Overall Compensation by Institution Type

Responses by institution type are fairly symmetrical, with no more than a 12 percentage point difference within any range in the chart. The most dissatisfied are respondents from the 4-year public colleges and universities, with 35 percent—more than one-third of respondents—reporting in the "dissatisfied" or "very dissatisfied" ranges. The most satisfied are respondents from the for-profit/other institutions, with 72 percent reporting in the "satisfied," "more than satisfied," or "highly satisfied" ranges.

A full 75 percent of suburbanites said they are well-paid.

Overall Compensation by Institution Type

Overall Compensation by Population Density

Satisfaction with overall compensation displays a somewhat more varied pattern of responses when reviewed by population density. The most dissatisfied are those working in non-metro locations of 2,500-19,999 population. Forty-five percent of that group reported in the "dissatisfied" or "very dissatisfied" range. Suburban institutions (in areas with 20,000-49,999 population) fare very well, with 75 percent of respondents reporting in the "satisfied," "more than satisfied," or "highly satisfied" ranges.

Eighty-nine percent of respondents indicated they are satisfied, more than satisfied, or highly satisfied with their job security.

Job Security

Job Security

Most—89 percent—of our respondents indicated that they are satisfied, more than satisfied, or highly satisfied with their job security. Eleven percent of our survey sample expressed dissatisfaction. Are the large majority feeling warm and fuzzy within ivy-covered walls, or are they holding buttoned-down contracts? No stats on that here. But the 89 percent pleased with job security speaks well for the higher ed IT-related job market.

Close to one-third of all respondents admitted that they are dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with their institutional culture.

Institutional Culture

Institutional Culture

Close to one-third (31 percent) of all respondents indicated that they are either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with institutional culture. Because all survey questions were asked within the framework of the respondents' own jobs within higher education, it is a fair assumption that this dissatisfaction can be seen as more related to barriers to getting their IT-related work done than as an indictment of higher education in general. Only 9 percent of respondents indicated they are highly satisfied with institutional culture. Clearly, schools need to do work here.

Male and female respondents reported identical satisfaction when it comes to meeting their expectations of flexibility in work schedules.

Flexibility in Work Schedule Flexibility in Work Schedule by Gender

Flexibility in Work Schedule

Respondents are overwhelmingly satisfied with flexibility in their work schedules, with only 10 percent indicating that their expectations have not been met. It's notable that male and female responses are equal (at 43 percent) regarding flexibility equal to their expectations. Male responses inch up only six percentage points over females, vis-à-vis flexibility exceeding expectations. Still, the survey did not specifically study accommodations for family leave or flexibility issues for parents with young children, so inferences in those areas would likely be unreliable, and would be influenced by the relative maturity of respondents overall.

Less than 10 percent of our respondents indicated they are highly satisfied with the professional development and training aspects of their careers.

Professional Development and Training

Professional Development and Training

In general, three quarters of respondents are satisfied or more than satisfied with the professional development and training aspects of their careers. Still, less than 10 percent indicated they are highly satisfied in this category.

The only institution type showing less than 74 percent of responses in the upper three ranges was the 'Vocational/ Technical College' category.

Professional Development and Training,
by Institution Type

Professional Development and Training, by Institution Type

Responses by type of institution displayed a similar pattern overall, with the largest proportion of respondents consistently reporting in the mid ("satisfied, about equal to my expectations") range. At first glance, four-year public colleges and universities may appear to have a slight edge, showing the largest percentage—46 percent—in that middle bar. But they share the same percentage— 74 percent—of responses in the combined "satisfied," "more than satisfied," and "highly satisfied" ranges with both the four-year private colleges and universities and the for-profit/other institutions. Four-year publics also run neck-and-neck with the two-year private/public colleges, which show 76 percent in those upper three ranges. The only institution type showing less than 74 percent of responses in the upper three ranges: Vocational/technical colleges, logging 69 percent satisfied or above for professional development and training.

Well over one-third of all respondents indicated that they are either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with their organization's overall management.

Satisfaction With Overall Management

Satisfaction With Overall Management

More than one-third—38 percent—of all respondents indicated that they are either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied with their organization's overall management. A modest 4 percent said they are highly satisfied. But combine those highly satisfied respondents with the next two levels of satisfaction and the majority still rules, where 63 percent indicated they are satisfied, more than satisfied, or highly satisfied.

When it comes to prospects for their careers, the vast majority (81 percent of all respondents) reported that they are satisfied the future looks good.

Career Prospects

Career Prospects

Respondents were asked to reflect on prospects for their future careers. Whereas 20 percent said they are dissatisfied or very dissatisfied regarding their future prospects, the vast majority—rounded to 81 percent of all respondents—placed themselves in the "satisfied," "more than satisfied," or "highly satisfied" categories. Let's not forget the old adage, "You make your own luck."

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