The IMS Global Learning Consortium spots learning technology satisfaction and trends.

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Are You Satisfied?

The IMS Global Learning Consortium spots learning technology satisfaction and trends.

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Product categories relevant to course delivery and course management systems (CMS)—assessment, capture, authoring, presentation and collaboration, digital content, and CMS—rated higher for satisfaction than other learning technology services, portals, and most notably, student information systems. Source: IMS GLC Learning Technology Satisfaction and Trends, 2007.

THE IMS GLOBAL LEARNING CONSORTIUM released the latest report in its ongoing study of “Learning Technology Satisfaction and Trends” in February, based on responses from about 200 leaders of internet-supported learning initiatives in North American higher education. The report is issued in different versions for the public, respondents, and IMS members and subscribers. Access to the public report and summary rankings can be found here.

While IMS views the research as still being “in its infancy and preliminary,” and has the intention of evolving the study over time, the organization has presented some intriguing trend data from the past year.

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The IMS GLC study cuts across a wide spectrum of technologies that support or enable learning at higher education institutions, so the “top ten” vendor/ product ratings include a mix of technologies, from course management systems (CMS) and mobile learning devices, to content search tools. Source: IMS GLC Learning Technology Satisfaction and Trends, 2007.

The IMS GLC study tracks satisfaction both for general product categories and for particular vendors and product offerings. Some product categories ancillary to course management systems (CMS)—such as capture, authoring, and digital content—were rated higher for satisfaction than the CMS category itself, suggesting a strong interest in interactivity and rich media content. Among the CMS, eCollege, Angel Learning, and Moodle (not in the top ten, with a rating of 3.43) were rated higher for satisfaction than either market leader Blackboard (rating: 2.97) or its WebCT property (rating: 2.87). The report pointed to the appearance of high ratings for Google, Wikipedia, and Apple’s iPod, “indicating that non-education-specific technologies are being perceived, by those that incorporate them, as adding value to the educational experience.”

Editor’s note: IMS Global Learning Consortium CEO Rob Abel will present “What Is the Learning Impact of the Technology- Empowered Education You Deliver?” at Campus Technology 2007 in Washington, DC, July 30-Aug. 2.

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