Electronic Textbooks

E-books are being widely adopted as alternatives to traditional textbooks. Here you'll find articles detailing new developments in the area of e-book and e-textbook technologies, along with stories about institutions adopting them.


Arizona State and U Michigan Try Digital Texts

Two major institutions--Arizona State University and the University of Michigan--are giving faculty a chance to try out digital versions of textbooks; one has adopted the program, and the other is running a pilot.

When Textbooks and Social Media Collide

A professor at a Christian liberal arts college in Michigan puts textbooks together with social networking to get students jazzed about historical events.

Ohio System Teams with Flat World Knowledge on Freebie Digital Textbooks

The University System of Ohio is setting a spark under faculty members to encourage them to try out digital textbooks in the classroom with a new pilot program that will allow 1,000 Ohio students to receive the texts for free.

Reading in the Dark Ages

It’s 2011 already. What’s the holdup with e-readers designed for the needs of academia?

Can Tech Transcend the Textbook?

As the e-book market explodes, publishers and educators debate why e-textbooks lag behind -- and what they should even look like.

Student-Driven Content

OERs open the door for students to take control of the learning process.

Google Enters the E-Book Fray. What Does It Mean?

When one of the country's biggest technology companies--a company that has already digitized more than 15 million volumes as part of a mission to make humanity's literary treasures available to all--decides to sell e-books, it's easy to see the move as a defining moment.

Is Ed Tech Accessible Enough?

Technology opens doors for college students and teachers, but it's not always adequate for non-traditional learners, despite meeting existing accessibility standards, according to professors at Western Michigan University.

Student Research: Can Googling Replace $168 Intro to Psych Textbook?

Students are taking the battle against high-priced textbooks into their own hands. This week, 11 University of Cincinnati seniors in the psychology program presented at an Educause event a comparison of the content of traditional college texts, one of which costs $168, to content they found for free on the Web.

Moberly Area CC Contracts with Pearson for Digital Resources

A Missouri community college system with seven campuses will be offering its 5,000 students the chance to purchase textbooks in digital form, get course help online, and use online reference resources.