Education Technology News

The latest education technology news and trends for college and university ed tech professionals. Looking for more in-depth coverage of important topics? Visit our feature article pages!


Report Pegs Cost to Develop an OER Course at $11,700

According to a recent research project, developing an open education resources course costs, on average, about $11,700, to cover salary and benefits for the instructors involved. Those results come from a study examining the implementation of OER in colleges. The work was commissioned by nonprofit Achieving the Dream.

Report: Students Prefer Courses that Use Open Educational Resources

Students like courses that use open education resources over their typical classes. In a recent research project, most reported that they experienced a boost in their learning experience; 59 percent said the quality of the instructional materials was better; 57 percent considered the caliber of teaching higher; and 54 percent claimed a stronger level of engagement. Those results come from a study examining the implementation of OER in colleges. The work was commissioned by nonprofit Achieving the Dream.

LinkedIn: Gen Z Defines Job-Hopping Generation

According to a new LinkedIn survey, Gen Zers are three times more likely to job hop and even switch industries than Baby Boomers.

Harvard Extension School and MIT Partner for MicroMasters Credential Pathway

Learners who complete a M.I.T.x. MicroMasters credential in Data, Economics, and Development Policy or Supply Chain Management can now apply their work toward a Master of Liberal Arts degree at Harvard Extension School.



Survey: Most 2-Year Colleges Lack Financial Resources to Support Student Success Programming

While plenty of programs for first-year students — summer bridge, first-year orientation, first-year student success courses, advising and counseling, learning communities — have found success in four-year colleges and universities, a new study examined the issues two-year schools face in getting students engaged in the campus, staying in school and accumulating credits. The most common problem for two-year institutions: a lack of financial resources, mentioned by 74 percent of respondents.

EdX Launching 9 New Master's Degree Programs

Online learning destination EdX today announced nine new master's degree programs, which offer a top-ranked, high-quality alternative to an on-campus degree at a fraction of the cost, according to the company. Three of the programs, in fact, are from top-10-ranked institutions and priced at under $10,000.

20 Percent of Workers Ill-Prepared for Current, Future Work

At a recent event, Gartner analysts told human resources attendees that just 30 percent of employees have the right skills for their current jobs, and only 20 percent have the right skills for both their current and future work. In research presented at the Gartner ReimagineHR conference in London, the company suggested that the skills gap is a result of the continuing digitalization being undertaken by organizations that want to remain competitive.

New 2-Year Online College Promises Future-Proofed Job Skills, Offers Free Tuition for First Cohort

A new two-year online college opening in January 2019 promises to instill the "future-proofed" skills students will need for management jobs that are ubiquitous and growing. Intended for working adults in the United States, Foundry College will be granting free tuition for the entire two years for its first cohort.

Ivy Tech CC Rolls out Interactive, Adaptive Digital Biology Course

Ivy Tech Community College in Indiana recently announced it will use BioBeyond as the standard course for all of its online introductory biology courses. The college, which has more than 40 campus locations serving nearly 71,000 students, piloted the digital biology course over the summer, and now plans to use it in 37 online sections.

Use of Adjuncts Hurting CC Education Outcomes

A researcher recently undertook a study at a large community college system to see what impact the use of non-tenure-track faculty had on student outcomes. According to Di Xu, an assistant professor in the School of Education at the University of California, Irvine, an initial rise in grades in introductory courses taught by part-timers eventually reversed itself in subsequent courses. Xu's research results were recently published in the American Educational Research Journal.

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