Research, Surveys & Forecasts


LinkedIn: Gen Z Defines Job-Hopping Generation

According to a new LinkedIn survey, Gen Zers are three times more likely to job hop and even switch industries than Baby Boomers.

Survey: Most 2-Year Colleges Lack Financial Resources to Support Student Success Programming

While plenty of programs for first-year students — summer bridge, first-year orientation, first-year student success courses, advising and counseling, learning communities — have found success in four-year colleges and universities, a new study examined the issues two-year schools face in getting students engaged in the campus, staying in school and accumulating credits. The most common problem for two-year institutions: a lack of financial resources, mentioned by 74 percent of respondents.

20 Percent of Workers Ill-Prepared for Current, Future Work

At a recent event, Gartner analysts told human resources attendees that just 30 percent of employees have the right skills for their current jobs, and only 20 percent have the right skills for both their current and future work. In research presented at the Gartner ReimagineHR conference in London, the company suggested that the skills gap is a result of the continuing digitalization being undertaken by organizations that want to remain competitive.

Use of Adjuncts Hurting CC Education Outcomes

A researcher recently undertook a study at a large community college system to see what impact the use of non-tenure-track faculty had on student outcomes. According to Di Xu, an assistant professor in the School of Education at the University of California, Irvine, an initial rise in grades in introductory courses taught by part-timers eventually reversed itself in subsequent courses. Xu's research results were recently published in the American Educational Research Journal.

Community Colleges Seek to Boost School Presence with Partnerships

Community colleges are the most likely among all kinds of post-secondary schools to view their work with external partners, such as employers and industry or even other institutions, as worthwhile. In a recently published survey, 57 percent of community colleges ranked partnerships "of all kinds" of the "highest importance," compared to just 21 percent of four-year private colleges and universities and 28 percent of four-year publics. The survey was conducted earlier this year by the University Professional and Continuing Education Association and Blackboard.



The Future of Work When Machines Take It Over

Will we humans lose more jobs than we gain when machines take over the world of work, or will it be just the opposite? According to the latest report from the World Economic Forum, we can expect a "net positive outlook for jobs." While about half of today's jobs will remain "stable" up to 2022, the rest will need to undergo adaptation through reskilling and upskilling.

Survey: 1 in 4 Professors Ban Mobile Phone Use in Class

In our third annual Teaching with Technology Survey, a quarter of faculty respondents said they do not allow students to use mobile phones in the classroom.

Survey: Demand for Cybersecurity Education Is High

In a recent survey from Champlain College Online, 41 percent of respondents said they would consider returning to college for a cybersecurity degree or certificate in order to prepare for a cybersecurity job. And 72 percent would be willing to do the same if their current employer would pay for their training.

Researchers Building a Better Way of Placing Students in Community College

A recently published report from the Community College Research Center and social policy researcher MDRC examined alternatives to traditional placement testing for math and English. According to "Toward Better College Course Placement," about 60 percent of community college students are directed into at least one remedial education course based on their results from placement tests, while roughly a third of them are probably "misdirected."

Study: Job Earnings Data Does Not Impact Students' Choice of Major

An issue brief published by Rutgers University specifically examined whether access to labor market data changed students' choice of major or perceptions of earnings or job security. The bottom line: When students didn't know any better, they expected to earn more than they should; yet having access to earning data didn't sway students to consider changing majors.

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