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7 Institutions Adopt Big Data Training Program

Seven institutions have adopted a new partnership program designed to develop qualified data professionals. Created by Cloudera, a developer of Apache Hadoop-based data management software, the program, the Cloudera Academic Partnership—dubbed the CAP program—provides partner colleges and universities with curriculum and training they can use to create courses in advanced data technologies.

Member institutions include Auburn University, California State University, Los Angeles, Harvard University: Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, Purdue University, San Jose State University (SJSU), Technische Universität Berlin, and University of Stavange in Norway. SJSU was the first institution to implement the CAP program, according to a statement from Cloudera, with its "Introduction to Big Data" course that debuted in 2012.

"Big Data is one of the hottest technology segments right now," says Peter Zadrozny, Big Data lecturer at the Silicon Valley-based institution. "I designed the course with the employer in mind. Students will have cleared the bulk of the learning curve by going through this course. When graduates seek employment, they will have a three- to six-month productivity jump on other candidates. I'm especially pleased that this training gets students hired and working creatively with data."

Cloudera training materials are available for download, at no charge, to faculty members and students at partner institutions. Cloudera certification exams and Cloudera University training are available at discounted rates. CAP members also receive a University License of Cloudera Manager Enterprise Edition. The license provides these institutions with free access to the software suite for 12 months.

Institutions interested in joining the CAP program can request an application form or visit Cloudera's Web site for more information.

About the Author

Kanoe Namahoe is online editor for 1105 Media's Education Group. She can be reached at knamahoe@1105media.com.

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