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UNC Charlotte Beefs Up Video Programming

The University of North Carolina (UNC) at Charlotte has recently beefed up its video programming, thanks to a new mobile electronic newsgathering (ENG) system developed by the school's broadcast communications department. The system allows roaming field crews to capture and transmit video from remote locations.

The school's new field solution includes equipment from Dejero, a manufacturer of cellular newsgathering products based in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada.

"Budget is always a consideration for a university, and the Dejero equipment has given us the flexibility to capture high-quality HD video from any remote location without having to make a large capital outlay in satellite or microwave trucks," said Craig Berlin, director of broadcast communications at the school, in a prepared statement. "The ENG footage has added an eye-catching new dimension to our video programming, and for the first time we're able to include remote live shots in our broadcasts. We use the Dejero LIVE+ 20/20 transmitter for every shoot that's outside the studio."

The system has been put to work covering the school's football team, the first in UNC Charlotte's 67-year history. A field video crew uses the Dejero LIVE+ VSET 1-U rackmount transmitter to record pre- and postgame sideline interviews with players and coaches then send the HD video back to the studio. The transmitter runs over the school's Ethernet network. Another video crew uses the Dejero LIVE+ 20/20 transmitter to gather footage of tailgate parties, fan celebrations, and other game day events. The broadcast department packages the video into its pre- and postgame shows, which are then "broadcast on the UNC Charlotte cable channel and streamed to the university's website."

Additional information about the newsgathering products can be found online.

About the Author

Kanoe Namahoe is online editor for 1105 Media's Education Group. She can be reached at knamahoe@1105media.com.

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