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Report: Remote Employees Need to Feel More Connected

Remote employees across all sectors prefer working from home at least part of the time, according to a recent survey by learning platform company Kahoot! and HR research and advisory firm Workplace Intelligence. But, the report emphasized, they need to feel more connected and reap the same benefits as onsite workers.

According to the report: "While most companies will adopt a hybrid model where employees can split their time between remote and office work, survey responses indicated that remote workers tend to be seen as less connected to colleagues, less likely to be included in important discussions, and may receive fewer training opportunities. Conversely, office workers are deemed more likely to get regular raises and promotions and remain with the company for longer."

As a result of remote work during the pandemic, 77 percent of respondents in the Kahoot!/Workplace Intelligence survey said they prefer to work remotely at least part time, with 53 percent preferring a hybrid arrangement.

"But for the hybrid workplace to succeed," the report noted, "technology that supports efficiency won't be enough — technology that drives emotional connectedness will be key, since 91 percent of employees want to feel more connected to their teammates. The ability to socialize also contributes to employee connectedness, according to 72 percent of employees who say it's important that they can have fun with their colleagues during the workday."

The full report is available on Kahoot!'s site (registration required).

About the Author

David Nagel is editorial director of 1105 Media's Education Technology Group and editor-in-chief of THE Journal and STEAM Universe. A 29-year publishing veteran, Nagel has led or contributed to dozens of technology, art and business publications.

He can be reached at [email protected]105media.com. You can also connect with him on LinkedIn at or follow him on Twitter at @THEDavidNagel (K-12) or @CampusTechDave (higher education).


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