Research, Surveys & Forecasts


Community Colleges Prioritizing Mobile Device Support

The top technology-related priority for community colleges in the coming year is mobile device and app support, according to a survey from the Center for Digital Education. About a third of those institutions have a strategy in place for use of mobile devices, and more than half are piloting the use of devices in the classroom but lack a formal strategy for doing so.

Educause Releases 2018 Horizon Report Preview

After acquiring the rights to the New Media Consortium's Horizon project earlier this year, Educause has now published a preview of the 2018 Higher Education Edition of the Horizon Report — research that was in progress at the time of N.M.C.'s sudden dissolution. The report covers the key technology trends, challenges and developments expected to impact higher ed in the short-, mid- and long-term future.

Education Sector Excels at Creating Strong Passwords

According to a recent report from cybersecurity training provider Wombat Security, end users in the education sector are more knowledgeable about building safe passwords than people in other industries. The 2018 Beyond the Phish Report analyzed user responses to nearly 85 million questions related to phishing and data security. Respondents came from 16 industries, including education, government, technology and manufacturing.

Analytics Work on Campus Still a Mixed Bag

Two-year institutions consider learning analytics more important than institutional analytics (those that improve operational efficiency), while four-year institutions believe the opposite. In a survey of 200 college and university leaders, 52 percent of two-year leaders favored learning analytics over institutional analytics, while just 35 percent of four-year schools did the same. The survey was sponsored by Ellucian, a major technology company serving higher education, and managed by Ovum, which contacted survey participants by phone. Respondents included presidents, provosts, chief financial officers and CIOs or CTOs.

Fewer Admissions Offices Using Student Social Media to Influence Acceptance Decisions

While most admissions officers consider checking out the social media profiles of college applicants "fair game," few actually do so. In a recent set of surveys, Kaplan Test Prep queried 388 admissions leaders from top U.S. colleges and universities as well as 914 high school students who have attended a Kaplan course. Among the first group, 68 percent reported having no qualms about checking out student social media profiles on sites such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Just 29 percent said they have actually done it.



Higher Ed Tends to Give Innovation More Lip Service than Formal Backing

Should higher education institutions invest money in their innovation efforts? Most colleges don't seem to think so. A survey among U.S. academic administrators found that while 91 percent of institutions reference innovation in their strategic or academic plans, just 40 percent have a dedicated budget for innovation. According to "The State of Innovation in Higher Education," a report from the Online Learning Consortium and Learning House, without earmarked funds to support innovation efforts, formal planning goals backing innovation may not succeed.

Study Finds Flipped Classroom Model Does Not Improve Grades in Health Science Course

A study at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that in a health science course following the flipped classroom model, there was no statistically significant differences in test scores or students' assessments of their course, compared to a traditional lecture course.

Report: 7 in 10 Attempted Data Breaches in Education Are Financially Motivated

One in five attacks on educational institution were motivated by espionage, often targeting sensitive research, and 11 percent of attacks are "just for fun," according to the report.

Research: Online Courses Associated with Improved Retention, Access

Online courses are associated with higher retention and graduation rates, increased access and cost savings of as much as 50 percent, according to a new study from Arizona State University.

Even the Mere Presence of a Smartphone Makes You Dumber

A joint research project at several universities found that the "persistent presence" of smartphones comes at a "cognitive cost." Researchers in the schools of management at the University of Texas at Austin and the University of California, San Diego as well as the Department of Social and Decision Sciences at Carnegie Mellon ran two experiments to attempt to measure how well people finish tasks when their smartphones are nearby — even if the phones aren't in use.

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